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The 3 Signs Telling You Your Purpose in Life

June 26, 2015 Leave a comment

In his latest book, The Art of Work, bestselling author and blogger, Jeff Goins offers some unconventional advice to help you abandon the status quo and kick start a life work that’s packed with passion and purpose. In an interview with Goins, he shared three actionable tactics that anyone can use to identify their calling.

1. Listen to your life.

According to Goins, the best place to begin charting your future is by taking a look at your past.

“One of my favorite quotes is from Parker Palmer when he says, ‘Before I can tell my life what I want to do with it, I need to listen to my life to tell me who I am,” said Goins.

The elevator speech for this tactic is being more self aware about what you’ve accomplished or not accomplished in the past. The intent is to look for a unifying thread or pattern that’s consistent throughout your past experience that’s also consistent with your passion and skills.

That unifying pattern or thread should energize you once you recognize it. Goins says this retrospection will also identify those activities in the past that you should avoid as you move forward because they drained you or amplified weaknesses.

“I don’t believe your past necessarily dictates your future but it should inform it,” said Goins.

2. Accidental apprenticeships.

The reality is that nobody achieves success or realizes their life purpose by themselves. It’s a process that requires and demands a team of mentors providing guidance.

According to Goins, that kind of help is all around us — we just don’t always see it.

“Every story of success is a story of community. Some people will help you willingly, while others may contribute to your education on accident. If you are wise, you can use it all,” said Goins. “Even though each of us has a unique journey, it’s full of teachers who can help along the way. Your job is not to seek them out necessarily, but to recognize them when they appear, because oftentimes they’re closer than you think.”

3. Prep for painful practice.

There’s a myth that once you know what it is that you’re supposed to pursue, achieving that purpose will be easy because it plays to your strengths and passion. That’s not the case.

“The paradox is it’s difficult to achieve the level excellence that your calling should merit, but that struggle for mastery is also invigorating and fulfilling. It’s tough and not everybody realizes that until they’re in it,” said Goins.

Just as with professional athletes, musicians or artisans, expect to intentionally hone your craft to the point of exhaustion. Otherwise, mastery will elude you.

“Grinding it out is not fun. Painful practice is not fun, but it’s necessary to both clarify your purpose and achieve it,” said Goins.

The key is finding where your abilities and personal drive intersect the needs of others. According to Goins you can find that juncture by answering the following three questions:

  1. What do I love?
  2. What am I good at?
  3. What does the world need?

Once that sweet spot is identified you won’t have a job or even a career. You’ll have a life purpose.

(Thanks to Tor Constantino)

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We are All Part of a Very Long Journey. . .

June 23, 2015 Leave a comment

The Bridge to
According to these traditions [the traditions of ancient wisdom as found in the Upanishads as well as the spiritual traditions of other cultures], the world is indeed a theatre of experience and we find ourselves on its stage in order to learn lessons that can only be taught in a physical realm.

Moreover, we are enjoined to be aware that we have been given a precious opportunity to be born into this world of matter and consequences as human beings (rather than as fruit flies, or slime molds, or cockroaches, or stones).

After all, the whole biosphere is here to support us. Four billion years of evolution on earth have led us to a point where we can make very fine distinctions between good and evil, darkness and light, love and fear – where we can make conscious choices that will impact us and others in profound ways.

This is why, in my view, modern technological society can only be described as demonic. It appears to have been expressly engineered to switch people off to the wider implications, and the wider mystery, of being alive.

It bombards our consciousness with sterile, soulless messages of production and consumption, of envy and greed, that never get to the fundamentals of anything. It seeks to convince us that we’re just meat – just accidents of physics and chemistry – that our only purpose is to produce and consume as much as possible, and that when we’re dead, we’re dead and that’s the end.

I don’t believe those messages! I think we’re part of a very long journey. . .

Graham Hancock